This branch of the Austrian Hesch family is descended from Johann Hesch and his wife Marya (Schlinz) Hesch, who came to America from Oberschlagles, Bohemia with three sons: Paul, Mathias, and Anton. +++Johann & Marya settled in Buffalo County, Wisconsin but moved to Pierz, Mn in about 1885. .+++Mathias settled in Waumandee, Wisconsin and moved to Pierz in 1911. +++Anton never married but farmed with his dad in Agram Township, where he died in 1911.+++And Paul, my great grandfather, settled five miles away, in Buckman, Minnesota. He died there in 1900.

: : : : : : : : : : : :

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Nicholas Sand & Sophia Dehler

A clipping from the Minnesota Journal published on August 4th, 1903--an obituary of Sophia (Dehler) Sand.  (The red edge means Larry found it, for sure ☺).  I've had it in my files for ages and only re-discovered it this week.  Did you know that another John Dehler lived in LeSauk (later, Sartell)?  This Nicholas  was Mike Sand's younger brother (both born in Luxembourg).  After Sophie died, he   married Magdalena Brodie, who went on to adopt 2 orphan train kids.  The link tells that story ☺.


LEFT A LARGE FAMILY
_________
Funeral at Sauk Rapids of Mrs. Nicholas Sand.
SAUK RAPIDS, MINN.--Mrs Nicholas Sand died Saturday evening, aged 43 years.  Besides a husband, nine children are left.  She was a member of the Degree of Honor lodge, and daughter of Mr and Mrs John Dehler of LeSauk, wealthy farmers of that section.  The funeral took place yesterday from the cathedral.

Notes:  The cathedral would have been Immaculate Conception, the German church, in St Cloud....The "Degree of Honor Protective Association began in 1886 as the Ladies Auxiliary of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Membership was originally comprised of wives, daughters, mothers and sisters of the AOUW. Their purpose was to provide fellowship for the women, and also support the AOUW."  The nine kids were Odell, Sylvester, Alfred, Francis, George, Robert, Victoria, Alma and Gertrude.  

 I suspect the Sand family wasn't as important in the community as the Dehlers were.  

No comments:

Post a Comment